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quid3st

Texture mapping on multiple faces

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Hello,

I was building my level, finished with the layout and then started to add textures to walls. However, I've hit a dead end. I would like to select more than 2 different faces from different objects, which are right next to each other, together combining a wall, and apply a texture which would stretch or tile (doesn't matter which) uniformly across all the selected faces. Problems arise, around window panes or door frames, which are surrounded by minimum of 3 objects, that are part of the same wall. When I apply the materials, what happens, is that textures are applied separately to faces, without having any idea about adjacent walls.

The effect I am trying to achieve is something that is built in to GtkRadiant. If you select 2 or more faces that are adjacent to each other and apply the texture at the same time, the face select acts as if I've chosen one object only. What I would like to achieve: 

5ZZhZQI.png

As you can see, left and bottom parts (in red) are different wall pieces, however when I select these 2 faces and apply the texture at the same time, radiant is aware of this and stretches the texture accordingly. What I would not like to happen:

BYYrCdB.png

Applying materials does not take into account adjacent faces.

Thank you,

Cheers, quid3st

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Hi there, welcome to the forums! :)

That's a good idea to auto-match UVs if it's the same material being applied to adjacent faces. Pretty darn good guess that the user wants them to match up. I'll add that to our list of ideas for PB3, thanks!

On another note, mind if I ask some questions about your geometry?

  1. Judging by those stretched textures, it looks like you are scaling your objects? I'd recommend against that- scaling breaks batching in Unity (lower performance), and causes other general issues, best to always retain (1,1,1) scale. Not having to scale is one of PB's main benefits! :) Just grab those verts and pull them over as needed. Or, if you prefer to use the scale tool for some reason (I hate it), just select all the verts and scale up that way.
  2. It also appears you are using separate box objects for each chunk, like brushes in Radiant/Hammer/etc. While PB started out using that method, we've gone much further. You can extrude, cut, etc, and create much more efficient geometry this way.

Sorry if that's all old news to you, just checking in case it helps! :)

-gw

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karl,

Thanks, it works this way but I have to manually adjust them. What I'm looking forward to, is what GabrielW described. That they are automatically corrected when I apply the material.

Gabriel,

1. I see. The reason I did this, was that when I was finished building walls and started adding textures, everything was tiled. I expected to have 1 big wall texture but instead I got as many, as many squares I had. Later I found out that in UV Editor, the stretching option can be applied. Since I've got a lot of experience with Radiant, I'm just used to things working a little bit differently. In Radiant, I'm not sure, but I think if you apply the texture then initally it tries to add the original texture size to the wall, if the size is smaller than the face/plane, then it will be tiled/split from the position where the texture "ran out" because it was too small.

2. Yeah, again, in Radiant, each wall is a separate piece, which could easily be drawn on a 2D grid view. Plus sized accordingly to the previous piece you drew. This made prototyping in Radiant extremely fast. You only work in 2D mode, in Radiant, most of the time. I'll try cutting and extruding, as you suggested. :)

But perhaps another idea for future...perhaps add a way to create brushes and edit edges in a totally 2D grid mode, which should speed up the process of creating simple geometry by tons. It is much faster to navigate in 2D than 3D. It could be feature you get if you purchase the grid asset you're already offering. Or it could be a separate add-on ;). If you haven't tried Radiant then you should give it a go and see what I'm talking about. It might be a little bit confusing at first ,especially if you're used to working mostly in 3D.

Cheers,

quid3st

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Hey,

Gabriel, I tried what you told me to do. To use extrusion to create the wall. So I did, using extrude, edge loop and finally merging faces on that same object. This gave me the result I desired:

 x7xaeBl.png

 

Now I just have to figure out, how to split the wall into two pieces to make it tiled. Then again, I could just change the tile options in the UV editor. But yes, following the pattern you told me, makes operating with probuilder much easier. Previously I created a new cube and positioned it accordingly for each section of wall I created, which was a big time waste.

Cheers,

quid3st

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7 hours ago, quid3st said:

But perhaps another idea for future...perhaps add a way to create brushes and edit edges in a totally 2D grid mode, which should speed up the process of creating simple geometry by tons. It is much faster to navigate in 2D than 3D. It could be feature you get if you purchase the grid asset you're already offering. Or it could be a separate add-on ;). If you haven't tried Radiant then you should give it a go and see what I'm talking about. It might be a little bit confusing at first ,especially if you're used to working mostly in 3D.

No worries, I know exactly what you mean! :) I used to work in Hammer a lot, am familiar with the brush-based workflow and 2D views, big fan of that :) However, with an engine like Unity that doesn't have the BSP system to clean all that up and use it properly, instead everything is mesh-based, it's much better to build with extrude/cut/loop/etc. It means more work in some cases, but in others much less, and overall much more control and detail is possible.

Er- I got sidetracked. 2D views! Yes, actually Unity does have orthographic views, you can click on the green/red/blue handles in the view widget, then click the little three lines below so that they show all straight, that'll pop you into iso/ortho mode. ProGrids automatically shows a nice 2D grid once that's activated :)

About your points 1 and 2 in previous response, I admit I'm a tad confused. Do you mind making a short vid of how it works in Radiant, and what happened in Unity when you tried the same? Always looking for ways to improve PB for level design, and there's lots to learn from old-school mapping tools!

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5 hours ago, quid3st said:

Hey,

Gabriel, I tried what you told me to do. To use extrusion to create the wall. So I did, using extrude, edge loop and finally merging faces on that same object. This gave me the result I desired.

Now I just have to figure out, how to split the wall into two pieces to make it tiled. Then again, I could just change the tile options in the UV editor. But yes, following the pattern you told me, makes operating with probuilder much easier. Previously I created a new cube and positioned it accordingly for each section of wall I created, which was a big time waste.

Cheers,

quid3st

Great, glad it worked! One note: you don't need to merge the faces, if you want to retain separate geometry (easier to edit, I think). Just open the UV editor and select one face, convert it to Manual, then hold CTRL and click adjacent faces one by one to "Autostitch" them together :)

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Another note: UV editing/texturing is my #1 priority to clean up and simplify for PB3. The manual UV editor is an awesome tool (complimenting @karl there, not myself, haha), but it gets a bit complex for level design. So, a level design focused tool/mode is very much on my mind, and will be a big part of the PB3 re-build.

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