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astraldata

Icosahedron Blob-Brush

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Yep, exactly what I said -- use a brush to paint a blob of icosahedron (or polyhedron) geometry.

 

Not just any Geometry though -- this Geometry would be interesting because it would be resizeable -- and not only in scale, but also includes the the number of faces/triangles it would use for the icosahedron. The main use would be to intersect with existing geometry, potentially with an offset from (or into) the surface where the brush is touching (allowing the icosahedron to both sink into and/or be added outside of the existing geometry [read: as separated and away from where the cursor/brush was clicked on the surface, to potentially create little island blobs] so that organic-looking mass, essentially, could be added into the form (by way of tossing verts of the icosahedron that penetrate the mesh that exists before the icosahedron is added, then removing the verts of the other mesh that would have intersected the polyhedron, and finally welding and/or bridging the verts that didn't interesect at all to the remaining verts of the original mesh!), ultimately keeping the new generated mesh as low-poly as any user could possibly want -- the amount of geometry added would be set in the brush settings! -- while still allowing them to add organic-looking mass to a low-poly mesh object!

 

Think ProBuilder -- but with organic masses of polyhedrons/icosohedrons/etc. rather than cubes.

 

Your brushes could potentially be any of the following types of parametric shapes, outside of the standard icosohedron as well!:

 

IME23.gif

 

Granted, much of this could be done, of course, by simple Boolean operations.... but having a dedicated brush to make things like shaping terrain fast and easy? I'm totally in for that!

 

In my opinion, creating stuff like arches and things like these:

 

utah_20120513__MG_3255_56_57_58_59_60-Ed

 

and these:

 

db_Marinha_Double_Arch6251.jpg

 

-- QUICKLY -- all without ever leaving Unity...

 

 

...is beyond invaluable.

 

 

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That's a pretty neat idea for a brush - not one I think I've seen before either.  Just snowballing on the thought, we could probably use a mesh as a template for the brush application and have limitless brushes...

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I agree that using a mesh as a brush would be a great idea. I almost suggested it, but scaling icosahedrons of various vert/face counts I thought might be easier to predict (and implement) at first while managing materials, especially if you wanted to do them procedurally. But now that you mention it -- I'm all for that! :)

 

Assuming the custom mesh route, for usability, I'd prefer some preset groups of brushes like cubes, tubes, and icosahedrons (of different mesh topologies) to scale and flick through (perhaps with a toggle-through key, for quick selection) and then have custom brushes as a user-defined group (letting you select the custom meshes and add them to a list for that group so you can flick through these too), probably exactly how one selects the cubes/tubes/icosahedrons (perhaps select each group of brushes from a dropdown, then set their properties, or reset them to default, just below that dropdown).

 

Another idea, expanding upon the original concept of the brush mesh (assuming I didn't mention it already), but one could potentially even subtract the meshes too (sort of a boolean thing) in the same way that mesh's mass might have been added (surface offset + vert deletion + vert bridge/weld/matching.) Loose verts outside of the brush mesh doing the operation could simply be stretched to the nearest verts of the brush mesh doing the subtraction/deletion after the other mesh's verts that penetrated the brush mass were deleted. I would even say that any materials this part of the mesh had at one point could be removed entirely or replaced with the material/texture of your current brush otherwise.

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